So far, the switch from veteran Joe Flacco to rookie Lamar Jackson as the Baltimore Ravens’ starting quarterback has gone well from the standpoint of success, with four wins in the last five games.

Still, it has been, as Ravens leading receiver Willie Snead IV pointed out, a “big transition.”

‘With Lamar, it’s always about the repetitions we get in practice’

“Two different style quarterbacks and two different game plans, to be honest,” Snead, who leads the Ravens with 61 receptions for 626 yards and a touchdown, told Jim Miller and Pat Kirwan on Movin’ The Chains. “But with Lamar, it’s always about the repetitions we get in practice and then constantly talking throughout the day in meetings and just being on the same page, understanding the scheme of the run scheme and the pass scheme, so you’re just on the same page with that. And just understand what our job is for each and every play to try and execute and make sure we get positive yards with those guys in there.”

“Most of the time we try to run lots of the run plays, but then Lamar ends up taking the ball and we’re running outside.”

Jackson’s considerable running — he leads the Ravens with 566 yards and three TDs on 114 carries — is a dimension that has impacted how Snead and other members of the Ravens’ offense go about their jobs.

‘It’s tough to block for Lamar, but we’ve been having a lot of success’

“It’s really hard to block for Lamar, because you never know where he’s going to go,” Snead said. “Most of the time we try to run lots of the run plays, but then Lamar ends up taking the ball and we’re running outside. It’s tough to block for Lamar, but we’ve been having a lot of success the past couple weeks and we’re starting to get the hang of things of how Lamar runs the offense.”

Despite being best known for his prowess as a runner, Jackson does have plenty of arm talent, according to Snead. Catching passes from him, as opposed to Flacco, is a large part of the transition.

‘He’s got a quick release … so you’ve got to be able to see it’

“Lamar’s got a cannon, to be honest,” Snead said. “He’s got a quick release … so you’ve got to be able to see it. I think the thing with Lamar is he’s just still growing as a passer in this league. He’s so gifted running the football, it’s easy to work with, but when we’re when we’re talking about passing and throwing down the field, he’s got an electric arm. And it’s just him seeing the defense and trusting the things that he’s seeing in practice, on film and having it roll over into the game.

“It’s a very rare release. He side arms it sometimes. Sometimes it’s over the top. But I spend every day on the Jugs just to make sure that quick release is coming out, turn the head. It’s a transition, but as a receiver that’s what we get paid to do, is catch the football.”

Powered by WordPress.com VIP