Recently, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker stopped by SiriusXM Patriot for an exclusive edition of the Patriot Forum moderated by Stephen K. Bannon. What was on topic? His new book, Unintimidated: A Governor’s story and a Nation’s challenge.

The book itself delves into the challenges that Walker faced throughout his political career, specifically recounting the recent tribulations of the Wisconsin recall battle. The governor explained how he essentially inherited a broken public union system when he entered office — a system with a deep sense of corruption dismantling public education and other socially funded jobs. Walker points out that he was elected in a densely democratic populated area because the citizens wanted “leadership” in times of crisis. That “leadership” in turn allowed him, despite massive criticism, to put reforms into place; helping out the citizens in Wisconsin, specifically in the education sector. Walker also mentioned that he received constant push-back from public employee union bosses, who did not agree with his proposed reforms.

“They basically said just go ahead and do it — lay the people off. Their sense was ‘You’ll be gone in a couple of years. We’ll ask somebody new who’ll be on our side. We won’t give up our benefits and we’ll get our employees back,” Walker said. “But in the meantime they didn’t care about that new, young employee.”

Walker also discussed the time when the democrat senators in Wisconsin actually left the state in order to delay the reform that the governor wanted to put into place, noting that it particularly annoyed him. The governor couldn’t understand how the democrats could abandon their state, causing the Senate to try all sorts of methods to get them to return.

“Come and do your job, the arena is here in our state capitol, you hiding somewhere else is not what you’re elected to do,” Walker said.

Ultimately the democrats who left came back due to the Senate splitting the bill. Despite this, the divide within the senate caused huge crowds of about 100,000 protestors to go out into the streets. These protestors were actually the precursor to the Occupy movement that later moved to Wall Street in New York.

How did all of this affect the governor’s family? Walker recalls a time when around 5,000 people came to protest at his house, to when he received death threats and his children got personally attacked on social media. He admits that it was mainly due to his faith, and people’s prayers, that he could get through those hard moments.

“Hopefully the best lesson I can convey to my two sons…you can be true to principles, you can stand up and be firm and disciplined and be focused and do the right thing — but you can be decent about it,” Walker said.

Another topic at hand was the last presidential election when Mitt Romney lost against Barack Obama. Walker admitted that he believed Romney had a chance to win the presidency if he could show that he was in the game to fix things for the better of the nation. “If Mitt Romney shows that the ‘R’ next to his name…is not just for republican, it stands for ‘reformer,’ he can win,” Walker said.

That wasn’t the case though, Walker explained that the GOP messaging actually focused its time on attacking Obama when they should have been concerned with explaining what Romney’s presidency would be like.

What’s Walkers suggestion for the future? The governor explained that the GOP needs to learn from its mistakes in order to have a chance at winning the presidency.

“Americans need to hear not just what’s wrong with the other side, they need to hear what our plan is,” he said.

Hear the entire special, on your time, On Demand.

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