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SiriusXM hosts weigh in on Michael Dunn and the ‘Loud Music Trial’

February 18, 2014

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Yet another conversation of racism and gun violence takes the nation by storm only a few months after George Zimmmerman’s acquittal, when the verdict came in this weekend for the “Loud Music Trial.” Last week, Michael Dunn’s jury was hung on a first degree charge for the murder of 18-year-old Jordan Davis.

The incident took place in November when Dunn pulled into a gas station next to a SUV full of four African American teenagers who were playing music loudly. Dunn asked the teens to turn down the music, at which point Dunn alleges Davis threatened him. Dunn claimed to have seen the barrel of a gun and shot so as to defend himself, ultimately killing Davis.

While Dunn was acquitted of murder in the first degree, the Florida jury of seven women and five men did find him guilty of three counts of attempted murder–equating to a mandatory 60-year prison sentence. SiriusXM Star’s Jennifer Hutt weighs in on the jury’s controversial verdict.

“So, here we have a case where in a way justice is served… however [Dunn] is not being sent away for the death of Jordan Davis, and that’s a tough thing to reconcile,” said Hutt.

Mark O’Mara, former attorney of George Zimmerman, also shared his thoughts with Michael Smerconish on the verdict. O’Mara said that although the jury didn’t convict Dunn on a first degree murder charge, they didn’t fail to uphold their civic duty to the US justice system.

“I think the issue is not stand your ground, I don’t think it’s self defense… I think the focus should be on where we decide a person is acting reasonably when they get that fear which legitimizes deadly force,” O’Mara said.

And on the other hand we have Benjamin Crump, the Trayvon Martin family attorney, who believes Florida’s Stand Your Ground law allowed Dunn to get away with the murder of Jordan Davis.

“The jury is buying into this imaginary fear, so we got to change these laws and it would help if more of us were on the jury, it would help if more of us go to vote… to make sure laws like Stand Your Ground don’t get passed by us when we’re not looking,” said Crump.