ENTERTAINMENT, HOWARD STERN, TV

Howard, Jerry Seinfeld share love for Mad Magazine on ‘Comedians in Cars’

February 7, 2014

In June, Jerry Seinfeld joined Howard Stern in New York City on The Howard Stern Show. Thursday, Howard returned the favor, as his appearance on Seinfeld’s Web series, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, premiered online.

Seinfeld picked up Howard in a 1969 Pontiac GTO, The Judge edition. Seinfeld’s explanation for the choice:

A GTO is for a guy that wants to tell the world, “I will not be going quietly.” Which is why it’s a perfect car for my guest this week, Mr. Howard Stern, who, according to him, is the greatest radio broadcaster of all-time.

The interview started with Howard’s roots in radio, moved to Howard’s steadfast believe in the powers of therapy, and then shifted to – what else? – hair.

“My hair is an achievement,” Howard said – though later in the episode, he submitted that he would consider going with a crew cut similar to what Seinfeld sports today.

The two grabbed a drink – Seinfeld coffee, Howard hot water – at Bel Aire Diner in Astoria, N.Y. Howard argued that of the two, he, not Seinfeld, is the face, to borrow wrestling terminology.

“I don’t think of you as a nice guy at all,” Howard told Seinfeld. “You’re brutally honest, and I think that you can be brutal. I’m the nice guy that’s sitting at the table.”

Howard and Seinfeld also learned that they share the same prized possession.

“Ill tell you the greatest thing that I’ve ever achieved in my career: I was on the cover of Mad Magazine,” Seinfeld told Howard.

“You know what’s in my office?,” Howard replied. “Mad Magazine, [my] cover. I’ve got it blown up the size of this window. And it’s all that mattered to me. It’s the most important thing.”

“How crazy is that, we both feel this way,” Seinfeld added.

To watch the full episode – which you absolutely should – visit Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee website.

For more Howard Stern coverage, follow @sternshow on Twitter and Instagram, and visit howardstern.com.

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